"Originally, in the 20s and 30s, the stereotype of someone who was schizophrenic was the housewife who was sad and withdrawn, and would not do her duties as a housewife; would not do the housework. This was the typical case of schizophrenia. And then, in the 60s, something shifted. The actual criteria for schizophrenia shifted. A lot of psychiatrists and hospitals and police were encountering young, angry black men who were part of the civil rights movement. Who were part of the riots – the uprisings – in the Black Power movement. Who were angry. Who were perceiving a conspiracy of power against them, that was called paranoia. They would see it is white privilege, but it was called paranoia. And so we actually see the diagnositc criteria for schizophrenia change. So now you have anger and paranoia and hostility being included as criteria, whereas 30 years before they hadn’t been. Because the stereotype has changed. So there’s a way in which the DSM and the perspectives of the psychiatrists and the doctors who were giving these diagnoses is thoroughly politically constructed, and thoroughly dependent on the culture and context that they’re within."

Will Hall at Unitarian Church Vancouver Canada March 2012 - Transcript | Madness Radio (via blinko)

for anyone interested in reading more about how schizophrenia moved from being a diagnosis assigned to white, middle-class women to one used to pathologize and institutionalize noncompliant black men in the 1960s, jonathan metzl’s the protest psychosis: how schizophrenia became a black disease is a good place to start. i have a PDF scan of it, too — just ask.

(via onegirlrhumba)

(via house-of-mars-333)

@2 days ago with 11047 notes
#race #mental health #racism #history #medicine 

"Apparently, women of color were wearing their hair in such fabulous ways, adding jewels and feathers to their high hairdos and walking around with such beauty and pride that it was obscuring their status. This was very threatening to the social stability (read: white population) of the area at the time. The law was meant to distinguish women of color from their white counterparts and to minimize their beauty."

@1 week ago with 3892 notes
#history #racism #fashion 

http://thisisnotjapan.tumblr.com/post/92159773422/rabbitglitter-bankuei-gallifreyglo 

rabbitglitter:

bankuei:

gallifreyglo:

kwansimah:

ferenginar:

yungmethuselah:

If you think all Black people’s blogs are “social justice” blogs, you’re racist.

I read some newspaper article recently that pretty much summed up Tumblr and the responses to it…

@1 week ago with 32234 notes
#social justice #race #racism 

danielmcbatman:

  • Abraham Lincoln never fought vampires or zombies 
  • Adolph Hitler was not machine gunned to death in a movie theater in Paris
  • Marty McFly did not invent Rock and Roll
  • Richard Nixon never dispatched Dr. Manhattan to end the Vietnam War

You never complained about these changes to history, so shut the fuck up about a black man playing a fictional spy, you idiotic, racist pricks. 

(via siegkial)

@1 week ago with 41882 notes
#film #history #racism 

"When you, like Perez Hilton, equate being ‘fierce’ with black womanhood, you are not simply complimenting black women’s perceived awesome sassiness. You are saying that we are overtly strong, both emotionally and physically, which leads to us being denied the facets of femininity that white women are so easily given. This is dangerous in ways I cannot completely describe, but I’m going to try: Black women are raped more often than white women, because our ‘fierceness’ is linked to ideas of sexual promiscuity – rapists believe we ‘want it more’. When we are raped the police believes us less than white women, because our ‘fierceness’ makes them think we could have fought back if we really wanted to. When we are beaten by our partners, the same applies. When we argue with people, we are seen as immediately aggressive. If we raise our voices or get angry, it isn’t because you’ve done something stupid, it’s because we are black and we are female and our innate ‘fierceness’ makes us unreasonable and unworthy of being listened to. When we lose our children to violence, when we have to survive on food stamps and benefits, even when we go to prison, it’s all a-ok because black women are the fiercest of the fierce and so none of that is a problem and we can handle anything that’s thrown at us – and all of this has lead to a point where when we knock on a door to ask for help because our car has broken down, we are not given hugs and a cup of tea. We are shot in the face at point blank range because we are fierce, and therefore aggressive, unpredictable, and worthy of the mocking, fear and scorn that the world looks at us with."

Bridget Minamore 

Quote is from her good essay The ‘Fierce Black Woman’ Inside You Doesn’t Exist on Poejazzi, in response to Perez Hilton’s racist, misogynoiristic tweet “Inside every gay man is a fierce black woman!” Must read essay! Now, the very lazy response is for people to pretend like Perez is the only White gay man who has ever said this (as White privilege involves persistent attempts to individualize systemic issues as to deny accountability) or pretend that his specific awfulness (and yes, he’s awful) is the issue, not misogynoir itself which makes this is a common thing that many Black women hear every single day. I (that would be me, @thetrudz/@GradientLairdirectly tweeted him too. His response to every Black woman was ignorance that got increasingly worse over time that day, including him eventually enacting Godwin’s Law. 

If you notice carefully in this conversation, no one suggested that gay men do not experience homophobia or that when the conversation is about some Black women who treat gay men as “sidekicks” (which of course is wrong) is discussed, it should be discussed. So that derailment in the name of intersectionality (while of course ironically ignoring intersectionality origins) is not needed when it only happens as a gay man is being called out for misogynoir. As for the other predictable derailment, Perez having a Latina mother does not mean this is not about White supremacy, that he no longer has White-passing privilege, that his male privilege has evaporated nor means he is incapable of misogynoir and anti-Blackness. Finally, the derailment via male privilege and misogynoir—that Black women are empty and just “copying” and appropriating gay men—is not needed.

I know Perez thought this was an acceptable response to Pia’s video and she’s a Black woman but that is irrelevant. Privilege does not evaporate based on who you know that doesn’t have it.

Black women are not costumes to be worn or objects solely for consumption, period.

(via gradientlair)

Oh, brava to this last!  Very well said!

I’ve also seen this done with Asian women, and I would bet it also happens to Native American women. 

(via tamorapierce)

(via tamorapierce)

@2 weeks ago with 4680 notes
#race #racism #feminism #rape #rape culture #abuse #patriarchy #misogynoir #misogyny 

"Black neighborhoods have fewer parks and gyms,” says Ray. “And if there are facilities, they cater to men. Gyms might have weights but few cardio machines, for example, or there are basketball courts, but not bike paths. And when women enter these male-dominated spaces, they are more likely to be sexualized, or gazed at. This is less likely to happen in predominately white facilities because they have women-only zones. Curves or boot camps are good examples."

@2 days ago with 1233 notes
#race #racism #sexism #gender #intersectionality #health 

white-history-month:

elizajumel:

the first female chinese immigrant to america was a sixteen-year-old girl who was part of a cultural exhibit where she sat in a life-size diorama and people watched her eat with chopsticks while wearing silk clothes and that’s really all you need to know about the commodification of chinese women

Afong Moy.  Her name was Afong Moy.  Say the names of people who should be remembered.

(Source: watermillions, via siegkial)

@1 week ago with 24666 notes
#history #race #racism 

mikkynga:

aw man i thought this was some original thing : (

(Source: shoorm, via loryisunabletosupinate)

@1 week ago with 50985 notes
#bh6 #big hero 6 #disney #race #racism #whitewashing #media #film 
9monthvacation:

bouzen:

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public 
BGLH writes:
“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.
“WOW. Really?” I replied.
I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.
With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.
Read more here.

*YELLING*
MY SISTER WROTE THIS ARTICLE YALL ARE REBLOGGING HER ARTICLE IM SO PROUD HEYFRANHEY IS REBLOGGING MY SISTERS ARTICLE AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHUDHIEHWUIFHOEWHOHFJIOJWJIEJOIEJWIOIE
MY SISTER: https://www.youtube.com/user/CassandreBeccai

this is good supplemental historical context for the plot of “their eyes were watching god”

9monthvacation:

bouzen:

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public

BGLH writes:

“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.

“WOW. Really?” I replied.

I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.

With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.

Read more here.

*YELLING*

MY SISTER WROTE THIS ARTICLE YALL ARE REBLOGGING HER ARTICLE IM SO PROUD HEYFRANHEY IS REBLOGGING MY SISTERS ARTICLE AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHUDHIEHWUIFHOEWHOHFJIOJWJIEJOIEJWIOIE

MY SISTER: https://www.youtube.com/user/CassandreBeccai

this is good supplemental historical context for the plot of “their eyes were watching god”

(via stoneybooboo)

@2 weeks ago with 7057 notes
#history #race #racism #feminism #misogynoir #misogyny 
@3 weeks ago with 8684 notes
#race #racism #hip hop #rap #nicki minaj #iggy azalea #music industry 
"Originally, in the 20s and 30s, the stereotype of someone who was schizophrenic was the housewife who was sad and withdrawn, and would not do her duties as a housewife; would not do the housework. This was the typical case of schizophrenia. And then, in the 60s, something shifted. The actual criteria for schizophrenia shifted. A lot of psychiatrists and hospitals and police were encountering young, angry black men who were part of the civil rights movement. Who were part of the riots – the uprisings – in the Black Power movement. Who were angry. Who were perceiving a conspiracy of power against them, that was called paranoia. They would see it is white privilege, but it was called paranoia. And so we actually see the diagnositc criteria for schizophrenia change. So now you have anger and paranoia and hostility being included as criteria, whereas 30 years before they hadn’t been. Because the stereotype has changed. So there’s a way in which the DSM and the perspectives of the psychiatrists and the doctors who were giving these diagnoses is thoroughly politically constructed, and thoroughly dependent on the culture and context that they’re within."

Will Hall at Unitarian Church Vancouver Canada March 2012 - Transcript | Madness Radio (via blinko)

for anyone interested in reading more about how schizophrenia moved from being a diagnosis assigned to white, middle-class women to one used to pathologize and institutionalize noncompliant black men in the 1960s, jonathan metzl’s the protest psychosis: how schizophrenia became a black disease is a good place to start. i have a PDF scan of it, too — just ask.

(via onegirlrhumba)

(via house-of-mars-333)

2 days ago
#race #mental health #racism #history #medicine 
"Black neighborhoods have fewer parks and gyms,” says Ray. “And if there are facilities, they cater to men. Gyms might have weights but few cardio machines, for example, or there are basketball courts, but not bike paths. And when women enter these male-dominated spaces, they are more likely to be sexualized, or gazed at. This is less likely to happen in predominately white facilities because they have women-only zones. Curves or boot camps are good examples."
2 days ago
#race #racism #sexism #gender #intersectionality #health 
"Apparently, women of color were wearing their hair in such fabulous ways, adding jewels and feathers to their high hairdos and walking around with such beauty and pride that it was obscuring their status. This was very threatening to the social stability (read: white population) of the area at the time. The law was meant to distinguish women of color from their white counterparts and to minimize their beauty."
1 week ago
#history #racism #fashion 

white-history-month:

elizajumel:

the first female chinese immigrant to america was a sixteen-year-old girl who was part of a cultural exhibit where she sat in a life-size diorama and people watched her eat with chopsticks while wearing silk clothes and that’s really all you need to know about the commodification of chinese women

Afong Moy.  Her name was Afong Moy.  Say the names of people who should be remembered.

(Source: watermillions, via siegkial)

1 week ago
#history #race #racism 
http://thisisnotjapan.tumblr.com/post/92159773422/rabbitglitter-bankuei-gallifreyglo→

rabbitglitter:

bankuei:

gallifreyglo:

kwansimah:

ferenginar:

yungmethuselah:

If you think all Black people’s blogs are “social justice” blogs, you’re racist.

I read some newspaper article recently that pretty much summed up Tumblr and the responses to it…

1 week ago
#social justice #race #racism 
1 week ago
#bh6 #big hero 6 #disney #race #racism #whitewashing #media #film 

danielmcbatman:

  • Abraham Lincoln never fought vampires or zombies 
  • Adolph Hitler was not machine gunned to death in a movie theater in Paris
  • Marty McFly did not invent Rock and Roll
  • Richard Nixon never dispatched Dr. Manhattan to end the Vietnam War

You never complained about these changes to history, so shut the fuck up about a black man playing a fictional spy, you idiotic, racist pricks. 

(via siegkial)

1 week ago
#film #history #racism 
9monthvacation:

bouzen:

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public 
BGLH writes:
“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.
“WOW. Really?” I replied.
I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.
With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.
Read more here.

*YELLING*
MY SISTER WROTE THIS ARTICLE YALL ARE REBLOGGING HER ARTICLE IM SO PROUD HEYFRANHEY IS REBLOGGING MY SISTERS ARTICLE AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHUDHIEHWUIFHOEWHOHFJIOJWJIEJOIEJWIOIE
MY SISTER: https://www.youtube.com/user/CassandreBeccai

this is good supplemental historical context for the plot of “their eyes were watching god”
2 weeks ago
#history #race #racism #feminism #misogynoir #misogyny 
"When you, like Perez Hilton, equate being ‘fierce’ with black womanhood, you are not simply complimenting black women’s perceived awesome sassiness. You are saying that we are overtly strong, both emotionally and physically, which leads to us being denied the facets of femininity that white women are so easily given. This is dangerous in ways I cannot completely describe, but I’m going to try: Black women are raped more often than white women, because our ‘fierceness’ is linked to ideas of sexual promiscuity – rapists believe we ‘want it more’. When we are raped the police believes us less than white women, because our ‘fierceness’ makes them think we could have fought back if we really wanted to. When we are beaten by our partners, the same applies. When we argue with people, we are seen as immediately aggressive. If we raise our voices or get angry, it isn’t because you’ve done something stupid, it’s because we are black and we are female and our innate ‘fierceness’ makes us unreasonable and unworthy of being listened to. When we lose our children to violence, when we have to survive on food stamps and benefits, even when we go to prison, it’s all a-ok because black women are the fiercest of the fierce and so none of that is a problem and we can handle anything that’s thrown at us – and all of this has lead to a point where when we knock on a door to ask for help because our car has broken down, we are not given hugs and a cup of tea. We are shot in the face at point blank range because we are fierce, and therefore aggressive, unpredictable, and worthy of the mocking, fear and scorn that the world looks at us with."

Bridget Minamore 

Quote is from her good essay The ‘Fierce Black Woman’ Inside You Doesn’t Exist on Poejazzi, in response to Perez Hilton’s racist, misogynoiristic tweet “Inside every gay man is a fierce black woman!” Must read essay! Now, the very lazy response is for people to pretend like Perez is the only White gay man who has ever said this (as White privilege involves persistent attempts to individualize systemic issues as to deny accountability) or pretend that his specific awfulness (and yes, he’s awful) is the issue, not misogynoir itself which makes this is a common thing that many Black women hear every single day. I (that would be me, @thetrudz/@GradientLairdirectly tweeted him too. His response to every Black woman was ignorance that got increasingly worse over time that day, including him eventually enacting Godwin’s Law. 

If you notice carefully in this conversation, no one suggested that gay men do not experience homophobia or that when the conversation is about some Black women who treat gay men as “sidekicks” (which of course is wrong) is discussed, it should be discussed. So that derailment in the name of intersectionality (while of course ironically ignoring intersectionality origins) is not needed when it only happens as a gay man is being called out for misogynoir. As for the other predictable derailment, Perez having a Latina mother does not mean this is not about White supremacy, that he no longer has White-passing privilege, that his male privilege has evaporated nor means he is incapable of misogynoir and anti-Blackness. Finally, the derailment via male privilege and misogynoir—that Black women are empty and just “copying” and appropriating gay men—is not needed.

I know Perez thought this was an acceptable response to Pia’s video and she’s a Black woman but that is irrelevant. Privilege does not evaporate based on who you know that doesn’t have it.

Black women are not costumes to be worn or objects solely for consumption, period.

(via gradientlair)

Oh, brava to this last!  Very well said!

I’ve also seen this done with Asian women, and I would bet it also happens to Native American women. 

(via tamorapierce)

(via tamorapierce)

2 weeks ago
#race #racism #feminism #rape #rape culture #abuse #patriarchy #misogynoir #misogyny 
3 weeks ago
#race #racism #hip hop #rap #nicki minaj #iggy azalea #music industry