a-heart-of-calcifer:

ehlnofey:

When Ken Morrish picked this apple off a tree in his garden, he thought a prankster had painted half of it red.
But after inspecting it closely he realised that the remarkable split colours on the fruit were a natural phenomenon. And the bizarre apple turned Mr Morrish into something of a celebrity in his village with scores of neighbours queuing up to take a photograph of it.
Experts say that the odds of finding an apple with such a perfect line between the green and the red are more than 1million to one. [source]

My Biology major boyfriend got a scholarship for excellence in Botany as well as a scholarship for excellence in Biology and Zoology
I asked him if this his possible and all he said was “I don’t know, plants are fucking weird”

a-heart-of-calcifer:

ehlnofey:

When Ken Morrish picked this apple off a tree in his garden, he thought a prankster had painted half of it red.

But after inspecting it closely he realised that the remarkable split colours on the fruit were a natural phenomenon. And the bizarre apple turned Mr Morrish into something of a celebrity in his village with scores of neighbours queuing up to take a photograph of it.

Experts say that the odds of finding an apple with such a perfect line between the green and the red are more than 1million to one. [source]

My Biology major boyfriend got a scholarship for excellence in Botany as well as a scholarship for excellence in Biology and Zoology

I asked him if this his possible and all he said was “I don’t know, plants are fucking weird”

(via leafmotif)

@2 months ago with 161432 notes
#food #nature #science 

trevlee:

For those who don’t know me, I currently live and work in Yosemite National Park.  During the government shutdown I didn’t have to leave the park, so I had the whole park to myself, and I took full advantage of it!  There were no tourists, hardly any rangers, it was just me and my fellow employees.  The first day of the shutdown Melissa and I hiked to the top of Yosemite Falls and went to Eagle Peak to Camp.  **Click on images to see the caption and larger view.** 

(via pixibutt)

@3 months ago with 16736 notes
#yosemite #landscape #camping #nature 

Someone Recorded Crickets then Slowed Down the Track, And It Sounds Like Humans Singing - Enpundit 

blackblobyellowcone:

I am fascinated by all insects. We think they are disgusting, alien, dirty creatures, but they don’t have to be. The more I learn about them the more wondrous they become. Their world is so hidden from us yet without them we could not live. 

(via fyeahcutebugs)

@4 months ago with 332 notes
#crickets #nature #sounds #awesome 
stuckinabucket:

The bullhorn acacia is kind of sad as acacias go.  You know how most acacias produce alkaloids that taste nasty and keep things from eating them?  Well, bullhorn acacias don’t.  It’s like, get on the bus, bullhorn acacias.
Of course, bullhorn acacias are not hearing your noise, because they’re thinking outside the metabolically-expensive-poison box.
And what they’re thinking is that maybe if you like eating them, you’re really gonna like this face full of motherfucking ants they’ve got for you.
Yes, you read that right.  Instead of playing fair and making their own toxins to keep everything and their brothers off of their leaves, this plant outsourced that shit to ants.  Presumably this is because ants are easily bribed with food, generally looking for a fight, and, most importantly, can run really fast.  Acacias in general, while also easily bribed and kind of ornery, are not known for their speed and mobility.
You’re probably looking at that picture and going “Man, I am just not seeing a real place for those ants to live.  This plant is a terrible employer if it’s not even going to provide housing.  Also, those thorns are kind of nasty-looking, but they’re awful big.  I bet I could just avoid them and not step on the ant mound and be fine.”  And this is not an unreasonable thing to think!  Which is probably why the acacia already thought of it, and decided to keep its ant legions in its thorns.

Yup.  This plant has evolved a way to shoot stinging insects out of its thorns, just in case stabbing you didn’t get the point across.  This is because this plant is hardcore.
Now you may be sitting there going “I don’t know, ants are pretty metal, and that ant looks pretty metal even by ant standards.  Maybe they just really liked the idea of living in hollowed-out thorns and did this all on their own.”  And I can see why you’d say that, because it totally sounds like something ants would do, but you’d be tragically wrong.  You know how some ants will properly farm or half-assedly shepherd aphids because they suck out plant juices and process and concentrate the sugars in their waste, which the ants then treat like gatorade?  
The acacia tries to cut out the middle man there.  They produce little bundles of protein and fat called Beltian bodies and then stick them on their leaflet tips, which is basically just mocking herbivores at this point, and then on the leaf stalks they’ve got these fancypants glands that produce nectar, to further rub it in.  I mean, seriously.  This plant is just hanging out going “Oh, yeah, my leafy greens taste like cake, assholes.  You want this?  Hope you like ants, too, because that’s what else is there.”
So the ants are getting a super fucking sweet deal here, and it’s like, man, this plant is going way out of its way to keep these sons of bitches around.  Is it sure it wouldn’t be easier to just pony up with the alkaloids and taste gross?  Because it seems like it wouldn’t be nearly so cool, but it would be way simpler than growing these ant apartments and ant cafeterias and whatnot, and this plant probably isn’t vain enough to evolve based on sheer coolness.
Well, ants aren’t stupid, but they are pretty fucking territorial.  Remember how acacias are generally just not capable of getting up and wandering around?  The ants do that for them.  Any vines and shit trying to climb on the acacia get ant-murdered the same way herbivores trying to eat it get all face-stung, and the ants will go the extra distance of killing anything that tries to grow around the base of the tree.  They send out fucking ant doom-patrols looking for weeds.  And then they kill the shit out of them.
So, fucking bullhorn acacias, right?  They really hit on a cool scheme.  Surely they are the only plants that could pull this off.  Nope!  There’s a bunch of plants that have figured out how to make deals with ants, to the point where there’s a name for them: myrmecophytes. (“Myrmecophyte” is Greek for “Yo, dawg, there may have been a slight miscommunication after you said you liked plants.”).  Some of them don’t even do anything for ants except make a nice living space, because that way when the ants die and start their little ant graveyards in random unused spaces, the plant can use their little tenant corpses as fertilizer. (Note: Do not trust plants.  Ever.)

stuckinabucket:

The bullhorn acacia is kind of sad as acacias go.  You know how most acacias produce alkaloids that taste nasty and keep things from eating them?  Well, bullhorn acacias don’t.  It’s like, get on the bus, bullhorn acacias.

Of course, bullhorn acacias are not hearing your noise, because they’re thinking outside the metabolically-expensive-poison box.

And what they’re thinking is that maybe if you like eating them, you’re really gonna like this face full of motherfucking ants they’ve got for you.

Yes, you read that right.  Instead of playing fair and making their own toxins to keep everything and their brothers off of their leaves, this plant outsourced that shit to ants.  Presumably this is because ants are easily bribed with food, generally looking for a fight, and, most importantly, can run really fast.  Acacias in general, while also easily bribed and kind of ornery, are not known for their speed and mobility.

You’re probably looking at that picture and going “Man, I am just not seeing a real place for those ants to live.  This plant is a terrible employer if it’s not even going to provide housing.  Also, those thorns are kind of nasty-looking, but they’re awful big.  I bet I could just avoid them and not step on the ant mound and be fine.”  And this is not an unreasonable thing to think!  Which is probably why the acacia already thought of it, and decided to keep its ant legions in its thorns.

Yup.  This plant has evolved a way to shoot stinging insects out of its thorns, just in case stabbing you didn’t get the point across.  This is because this plant is hardcore.

Now you may be sitting there going “I don’t know, ants are pretty metal, and that ant looks pretty metal even by ant standards.  Maybe they just really liked the idea of living in hollowed-out thorns and did this all on their own.”  And I can see why you’d say that, because it totally sounds like something ants would do, but you’d be tragically wrong.  You know how some ants will properly farm or half-assedly shepherd aphids because they suck out plant juices and process and concentrate the sugars in their waste, which the ants then treat like gatorade?  

The acacia tries to cut out the middle man there.  They produce little bundles of protein and fat called Beltian bodies and then stick them on their leaflet tips, which is basically just mocking herbivores at this point, and then on the leaf stalks they’ve got these fancypants glands that produce nectar, to further rub it in.  I mean, seriously.  This plant is just hanging out going “Oh, yeah, my leafy greens taste like cake, assholes.  You want this?  Hope you like ants, too, because that’s what else is there.”

So the ants are getting a super fucking sweet deal here, and it’s like, man, this plant is going way out of its way to keep these sons of bitches around.  Is it sure it wouldn’t be easier to just pony up with the alkaloids and taste gross?  Because it seems like it wouldn’t be nearly so cool, but it would be way simpler than growing these ant apartments and ant cafeterias and whatnot, and this plant probably isn’t vain enough to evolve based on sheer coolness.

Well, ants aren’t stupid, but they are pretty fucking territorial.  Remember how acacias are generally just not capable of getting up and wandering around?  The ants do that for them.  Any vines and shit trying to climb on the acacia get ant-murdered the same way herbivores trying to eat it get all face-stung, and the ants will go the extra distance of killing anything that tries to grow around the base of the tree.  They send out fucking ant doom-patrols looking for weeds.  And then they kill the shit out of them.

So, fucking bullhorn acacias, right?  They really hit on a cool scheme.  Surely they are the only plants that could pull this off.  Nope!  There’s a bunch of plants that have figured out how to make deals with ants, to the point where there’s a name for them: myrmecophytes. (“Myrmecophyte” is Greek for “Yo, dawg, there may have been a slight miscommunication after you said you liked plants.”).  Some of them don’t even do anything for ants except make a nice living space, because that way when the ants die and start their little ant graveyards in random unused spaces, the plant can use their little tenant corpses as fertilizer. (Note: Do not trust plants.  Ever.)

(via leafmotif)

@5 months ago with 2430 notes
#plant #ants #nature #bugs #awesome 

catbountry:

zefrank:

True Facts About The Mantis Shrimp :: The Scariest Clown Ever

The Baltimore Aquarium has one of these guys. There is already hairline cracks in the glass and a note on the front asking visitors to not tap the glass.

(via teamtrashcaptains)

@9 months ago with 3244 notes
#heh #youtube #mantis shrimp #nature 

noxfae:

Floating Light - credit

(via smallworldsyndrome)

@2 months ago with 8212 notes
#forest #nature 
wolveswolves:

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WOLVES AND RAVENS
Ravens and wolves form social attachments with each other and take huge advantage of each other.
Both animals eat meat. When wolves killed a prey, ravens eat from the left over cadaver and scavenge it. Also, ravens lead wolves to preys or cadavers. The ravens fly and the wolves follow. Ravens also alert wolves to dangers.
They also play with each other. For example the ravens dive at the wolves and then speed away or peck their tails to try to get the wolves to chase them, or wolf cubs chasing after teasing ravens.
Dr. L. David Mech wrote in ‘The Wolf: The Ecology and Behaviour of an Endangered Species’: "It appears that the wolf and the raven have reached an adjustment in their relationships such that each creature is rewarded in some way by the presence of the other and that each is fully aware of the other’s capabilities."
Also very interesting: Bernd Heinrich wrote in ‘Mind of the Raven: Investigations and Adventures with Wolf-Birds’: "Ravens can be attracted to wolf howls. The wolves’ howls before they go on a hunt, and it is a signal that the birds learn to heed. Conversely, wolves may respond to certain raven vocalizations or behavior that indicate prey. The raven-wolf association may be close to a symbiosis that benefits the wolves and ravens alike. At a kill site, the birds are more suspicious and alert than wolves. The birds serve the wolves as extra eyes and ears."
Some videos: - Raven Dances with Wolf Pup - Ravens taking a bath in the snow after stealing food from wolves- Crow teasing a wolf
(Picture by Michael S. Nolan)

wolveswolves:

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WOLVES AND RAVENS

Ravens and wolves form social attachments with each other and take huge advantage of each other.

Both animals eat meat. When wolves killed a prey, ravens eat from the left over cadaver and scavenge it. Also, ravens lead wolves to preys or cadavers. The ravens fly and the wolves follow. Ravens also alert wolves to dangers.

They also play with each other. For example the ravens dive at the wolves and then speed away or peck their tails to try to get the wolves to chase them, or wolf cubs chasing after teasing ravens.

Dr. L. David Mech wrote in ‘The Wolf: The Ecology and Behaviour of an Endangered Species’: "It appears that the wolf and the raven have reached an adjustment in their relationships such that each creature is rewarded in some way by the presence of the other and that each is fully aware of the other’s capabilities."

Also very interesting: Bernd Heinrich wrote in ‘Mind of the Raven: Investigations and Adventures with Wolf-Birds’: "Ravens can be attracted to wolf howls. The wolves’ howls before they go on a hunt, and it is a signal that the birds learn to heed. Conversely, wolves may respond to certain raven vocalizations or behavior that indicate prey. The raven-wolf association may be close to a symbiosis that benefits the wolves and ravens alike. At a kill site, the birds are more suspicious and alert than wolves. The birds serve the wolves as extra eyes and ears."

Some videos: 
Raven Dances with Wolf Pup 
Ravens taking a bath in the snow after stealing food from wolves
Crow teasing a wolf

(Picture by Michael S. Nolan)

(via newyorketc)

@3 months ago with 37521 notes
#nature #animals #ravens #wolves 
oosik:

Olinguito, the newest mammal recently discovered on Earth.
In an age when 100,000 species become extinct each year, sometimes it seems that all there is left to do is to count up the losses. But as it turns out the age of discovery might not yet be over. In August of this year, Smithsonian scientists announced that they had discovered a new species of mammal: the raccoon-like Olinguito. 
Although the discovery of new species of invertebrates or amphibians isn’t unusual, the discovery of a new species of carnivorous mammal is. Especially since a mammal hasn’t been discovered in the Western Hemisphere since 1978. The last, most recent discovery of a mammal on Earth was in 2010 with the discovery of the Durrell’s Vontsira in Madagascar.  
According to Smithsonian zoologist Kristofer M. Helgen, who led the effort to identify the Olinguito, “The discovery of the olinguito shows us that the world is not yet completely explored, its most basic secrets not yet revealed.”  
The newly discovered Olinguito was found in the cloud forests of South America, in the western Andes of Colombia. A full-grown Olinguito, which has been described as “a cross between a teddy bear and a house cat,” is said to grow up to 14 inches long. These animals eat mostly fruit and only have one baby at a time. Their long claws and padded feet help them grip branches as they walk among trees in the cloud forest. 
Fortunately, unlike so many other species, Olinguitos are not at risk of extinction any time soon. Enjoy the pictures of this cute little creature below.

oosik:

Olinguito, the newest mammal recently discovered on Earth.

In an age when 100,000 species become extinct each year, sometimes it seems that all there is left to do is to count up the losses. But as it turns out the age of discovery might not yet be over. In August of this year, Smithsonian scientists announced that they had discovered a new species of mammal: the raccoon-like Olinguito.

Although the discovery of new species of invertebrates or amphibians isn’t unusual, the discovery of a new species of carnivorous mammal is. Especially since a mammal hasn’t been discovered in the Western Hemisphere since 1978. The last, most recent discovery of a mammal on Earth was in 2010 with the discovery of the Durrell’s Vontsira in Madagascar. 

According to Smithsonian zoologist Kristofer M. Helgen, who led the effort to identify the Olinguito, “The discovery of the olinguito shows us that the world is not yet completely explored, its most basic secrets not yet revealed.” 

The newly discovered Olinguito was found in the cloud forests of South America, in the western Andes of Colombia. A full-grown Olinguito, which has been described as “a cross between a teddy bear and a house cat,” is said to grow up to 14 inches long. These animals eat mostly fruit and only have one baby at a time. Their long claws and padded feet help them grip branches as they walk among trees in the cloud forest.

Fortunately, unlike so many other species, Olinguitos are not at risk of extinction any time soon. Enjoy the pictures of this cute little creature below.

(via harrysbhole)

@5 months ago with 4436 notes
#animals #nature 

pbsnature:

Before starlings roost, their maneuvers create mesmerizing aerial displays. To achieve synchronicity, each bird shadows seven of its nearest neighbors. EARTHFLIGHT: Europe on NATURE on PBS (check local listings) or watch the full episode of EARTHFLIGHT online. 

(via leafmotif)

@5 months ago with 5508 notes
#birds #nature #pbs 

ladymalchav:

alcoholicgifts:

The Potoo - Either the most unphotogenic or the most ridiculous looking bird in the world.

and my new best friend

image

how is this a real bird. nature, what are you doing

(Source: iwasteyourprecioustime)

@10 months ago with 78366 notes
#nature #seriously #this goddamn bird 
a-heart-of-calcifer:

ehlnofey:

When Ken Morrish picked this apple off a tree in his garden, he thought a prankster had painted half of it red.
But after inspecting it closely he realised that the remarkable split colours on the fruit were a natural phenomenon. And the bizarre apple turned Mr Morrish into something of a celebrity in his village with scores of neighbours queuing up to take a photograph of it.
Experts say that the odds of finding an apple with such a perfect line between the green and the red are more than 1million to one. [source]

My Biology major boyfriend got a scholarship for excellence in Botany as well as a scholarship for excellence in Biology and Zoology
I asked him if this his possible and all he said was “I don’t know, plants are fucking weird”
2 months ago
#food #nature #science 
2 months ago
#forest #nature 
3 months ago
#yosemite #landscape #camping #nature 
wolveswolves:

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WOLVES AND RAVENS
Ravens and wolves form social attachments with each other and take huge advantage of each other.
Both animals eat meat. When wolves killed a prey, ravens eat from the left over cadaver and scavenge it. Also, ravens lead wolves to preys or cadavers. The ravens fly and the wolves follow. Ravens also alert wolves to dangers.
They also play with each other. For example the ravens dive at the wolves and then speed away or peck their tails to try to get the wolves to chase them, or wolf cubs chasing after teasing ravens.
Dr. L. David Mech wrote in ‘The Wolf: The Ecology and Behaviour of an Endangered Species’: "It appears that the wolf and the raven have reached an adjustment in their relationships such that each creature is rewarded in some way by the presence of the other and that each is fully aware of the other’s capabilities."
Also very interesting: Bernd Heinrich wrote in ‘Mind of the Raven: Investigations and Adventures with Wolf-Birds’: "Ravens can be attracted to wolf howls. The wolves’ howls before they go on a hunt, and it is a signal that the birds learn to heed. Conversely, wolves may respond to certain raven vocalizations or behavior that indicate prey. The raven-wolf association may be close to a symbiosis that benefits the wolves and ravens alike. At a kill site, the birds are more suspicious and alert than wolves. The birds serve the wolves as extra eyes and ears."
Some videos: - Raven Dances with Wolf Pup - Ravens taking a bath in the snow after stealing food from wolves- Crow teasing a wolf
(Picture by Michael S. Nolan)
3 months ago
#nature #animals #ravens #wolves 
Someone Recorded Crickets then Slowed Down the Track, And It Sounds Like Humans Singing - Enpundit→

blackblobyellowcone:

I am fascinated by all insects. We think they are disgusting, alien, dirty creatures, but they don’t have to be. The more I learn about them the more wondrous they become. Their world is so hidden from us yet without them we could not live. 

(via fyeahcutebugs)

4 months ago
#crickets #nature #sounds #awesome 
oosik:

Olinguito, the newest mammal recently discovered on Earth.
In an age when 100,000 species become extinct each year, sometimes it seems that all there is left to do is to count up the losses. But as it turns out the age of discovery might not yet be over. In August of this year, Smithsonian scientists announced that they had discovered a new species of mammal: the raccoon-like Olinguito. 
Although the discovery of new species of invertebrates or amphibians isn’t unusual, the discovery of a new species of carnivorous mammal is. Especially since a mammal hasn’t been discovered in the Western Hemisphere since 1978. The last, most recent discovery of a mammal on Earth was in 2010 with the discovery of the Durrell’s Vontsira in Madagascar.  
According to Smithsonian zoologist Kristofer M. Helgen, who led the effort to identify the Olinguito, “The discovery of the olinguito shows us that the world is not yet completely explored, its most basic secrets not yet revealed.”  
The newly discovered Olinguito was found in the cloud forests of South America, in the western Andes of Colombia. A full-grown Olinguito, which has been described as “a cross between a teddy bear and a house cat,” is said to grow up to 14 inches long. These animals eat mostly fruit and only have one baby at a time. Their long claws and padded feet help them grip branches as they walk among trees in the cloud forest. 
Fortunately, unlike so many other species, Olinguitos are not at risk of extinction any time soon. Enjoy the pictures of this cute little creature below.
5 months ago
#animals #nature 
stuckinabucket:

The bullhorn acacia is kind of sad as acacias go.  You know how most acacias produce alkaloids that taste nasty and keep things from eating them?  Well, bullhorn acacias don’t.  It’s like, get on the bus, bullhorn acacias.
Of course, bullhorn acacias are not hearing your noise, because they’re thinking outside the metabolically-expensive-poison box.
And what they’re thinking is that maybe if you like eating them, you’re really gonna like this face full of motherfucking ants they’ve got for you.
Yes, you read that right.  Instead of playing fair and making their own toxins to keep everything and their brothers off of their leaves, this plant outsourced that shit to ants.  Presumably this is because ants are easily bribed with food, generally looking for a fight, and, most importantly, can run really fast.  Acacias in general, while also easily bribed and kind of ornery, are not known for their speed and mobility.
You’re probably looking at that picture and going “Man, I am just not seeing a real place for those ants to live.  This plant is a terrible employer if it’s not even going to provide housing.  Also, those thorns are kind of nasty-looking, but they’re awful big.  I bet I could just avoid them and not step on the ant mound and be fine.”  And this is not an unreasonable thing to think!  Which is probably why the acacia already thought of it, and decided to keep its ant legions in its thorns.

Yup.  This plant has evolved a way to shoot stinging insects out of its thorns, just in case stabbing you didn’t get the point across.  This is because this plant is hardcore.
Now you may be sitting there going “I don’t know, ants are pretty metal, and that ant looks pretty metal even by ant standards.  Maybe they just really liked the idea of living in hollowed-out thorns and did this all on their own.”  And I can see why you’d say that, because it totally sounds like something ants would do, but you’d be tragically wrong.  You know how some ants will properly farm or half-assedly shepherd aphids because they suck out plant juices and process and concentrate the sugars in their waste, which the ants then treat like gatorade?  
The acacia tries to cut out the middle man there.  They produce little bundles of protein and fat called Beltian bodies and then stick them on their leaflet tips, which is basically just mocking herbivores at this point, and then on the leaf stalks they’ve got these fancypants glands that produce nectar, to further rub it in.  I mean, seriously.  This plant is just hanging out going “Oh, yeah, my leafy greens taste like cake, assholes.  You want this?  Hope you like ants, too, because that’s what else is there.”
So the ants are getting a super fucking sweet deal here, and it’s like, man, this plant is going way out of its way to keep these sons of bitches around.  Is it sure it wouldn’t be easier to just pony up with the alkaloids and taste gross?  Because it seems like it wouldn’t be nearly so cool, but it would be way simpler than growing these ant apartments and ant cafeterias and whatnot, and this plant probably isn’t vain enough to evolve based on sheer coolness.
Well, ants aren’t stupid, but they are pretty fucking territorial.  Remember how acacias are generally just not capable of getting up and wandering around?  The ants do that for them.  Any vines and shit trying to climb on the acacia get ant-murdered the same way herbivores trying to eat it get all face-stung, and the ants will go the extra distance of killing anything that tries to grow around the base of the tree.  They send out fucking ant doom-patrols looking for weeds.  And then they kill the shit out of them.
So, fucking bullhorn acacias, right?  They really hit on a cool scheme.  Surely they are the only plants that could pull this off.  Nope!  There’s a bunch of plants that have figured out how to make deals with ants, to the point where there’s a name for them: myrmecophytes. (“Myrmecophyte” is Greek for “Yo, dawg, there may have been a slight miscommunication after you said you liked plants.”).  Some of them don’t even do anything for ants except make a nice living space, because that way when the ants die and start their little ant graveyards in random unused spaces, the plant can use their little tenant corpses as fertilizer. (Note: Do not trust plants.  Ever.)
5 months ago
#plant #ants #nature #bugs #awesome 
5 months ago
#birds #nature #pbs 
9 months ago
#heh #youtube #mantis shrimp #nature 
10 months ago
#nature #seriously #this goddamn bird